Inquiries about reserved decisions

The Supreme Court aims to deliver each judgment within three months from the date on which the judgment was reserved, unless the presiding judge has indicated otherwise.  For interlocutory matters or urgent matters, the appropriate time frame may be less than three months.

If a practitioner wishes to inquire about a delay in the delivery of a reserved judgment in a case in which he or she is acting, the practitioner may write to the President of the ACT Bar Association or ACT Law Society.  If it appears to the relevant President that the judgment has been outstanding for at least three months or is required urgently, the President will write to the Registrar.  The Registrar will refer the inquiry to the Chief Justice without disclosing the identity of the practitioner who has made the inquiry. The Chief Justice will inform the Registrar of the date when it is anticipated that the reserved judgment will be delivered.  The Registrar will write to the inquiring legal practitioner and the other party to the litigation (or their legal representative) advising them of the anticipated date.

If an unrepresented litigant is concerned about a delay in the delivery of a reserved judgment in a case in which he or she is a party, the litigant may write directly to the Registrar. The Registrar will refer the inquiry to the Chief Justice without disclosing the identity of the inquirer. The Chief Justice will inform the Registrar of the date when it is anticipated that the reserved judgment will be delivered. The Registrar will write to the inquirer and the other party to the litigation (or their legal representative) advising them of the anticipated date.

A practitioner or litigant who wishes to make a complaint (not merely an inquiry) about a reserved judgment should follow the complaint procedure set out below.